Document Signed by Colonel Harry Gilmor, CSA Spy, Scout and Raider,

Cowan’s Auctions

Excessively Rare Civil War Document Signed by Colonel Harry Gilmor, CSA Spy, Scout and Raider

Excessively Rare Civil War Document Signed by Colonel Harry Gilmor, CSA Spy, Scout and Raider

Excessively Rare Civil War Document Signed by Colonel Harry Gilmor, CSA Spy, Scout and Raider

Item description:

partially printed document signed by Gilmor, Comdg Compy., matted and framed with copy photo of Gilmor. 2.75″ x 7.5″ (sight), this “captured” Union form has United crossed out and Confederate written above. Receipt for 73,608 lbs. of corn and 72,376 lbs. of hay for April, May, and June 1862 in Camp in Valley of Virginia.

Screen Shot 2015-01-14 at 1.21.08 AMGilmor was a scout and raider operating in the Shenandoah Valley and western Maryland between the areas patrolled by John Mosby to his east and John McNeill to his west. He enlisted in the Confederate Army at the start of hostilities, quickly becoming conspicuous for his daring as a scout. He was promoted for gallantry at Harper’s Ferry in December 1861 and wounded two months later, reportedly while breaking up a fight. On recovery he was put in command of Company F of the 12th Virginia Cavalry.

Captured in September 1862 and imprisoned at Fort McHenry, Gilmor was exchanged in February in time to join the spring campaigns. June saw him moving through Frederick, Md., and on into Pennsylvania, capturing Chambersburg, Carlisle and Gettysburg. He was provost marshal of Gettysburg from July 1-4, 1863.

Gilmor’s guerilla raids continued to plague Union commanders through 1864. His raiders and raids easily created as much chaos as those of the better-known Mosby. Some of the most daring raids carried out by detached cavalry units were undertaken by Gilmor’s Raiders.

Gilmor was wounded (in battle this time) at Bunker Hill, W.V., in July 1864. He was ultimately captured in bed in Moorefield, W.V., by Union troops dressed in Confederate uniforms on Feb. 4, 1865. This time he was imprisoned in Boston Harbor and not released until after the war, in July 1865.

At the end of hostilities Gilmor moved to New Orleans where he married Mentoria Strong. He moved north to Baltimore shortly after, and published a book describing his memories of events. Gilmor eventually become police commissioner for the city. He died in Baltimore in 1883, reportedly from complications from a war injury, and was buried in an area known as “Confederate Hill” in Loudon Park Cemetery.

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